Welcome to our article where we will tell you off some well-known, (and some obvious), tips for visiting a Theme Park in the summer.

Follow Park Rules – This really seems like a no-brainer seeing how dangerous parks can be, but let’s also view it from a different angle. If you imagine how much work the Staff Members have to do in a normal day, then add another 10,000 people to that equation, then add the heat of the sun and extensive hours. You will most likely have a stressed out and tired Staff Member around the park. Now if you think that is bad enough, just think of how many times that Staff Member has had to repeat simple rules such as “ sit-down”, “don’t climb on the fence” and “no swearing” to customers not following the rules. The longer the Staff Member does this for, the less patience he has. So just think of the guys who are working long hours so that you can ride all those amazing attractions, and follow all rules around the park.

Keep an eye on younger children – Knowing where younger children are while in a Theme Park is a basic but essential safety practice. Just as vital is to have a plan for what to do if you get separated. “As soon as you arrive, point out safe places, like a park info kiosk, and safe people, like park security, that can help your kids if they get lost. Set a designated meeting place that everyone can easily find if separation occurs. When a Park has 3,000 plus young children in the gates on any one day, trying to find a last child or a lost parent can be difficult work. Another way of making sure lost children are found easier is by taking a photo of your child before you go into the park, so that Park Officials have a very up to date photo of the child and the clothes they are wearing. Likewise you can have a wristband on the child which could have the number of of one of the adults in the group, thus meaning the Park Officials can ring the number and sort out a place to meet and re-unite everyone.

Take essential breaks – High-speed rides take a toll on young bodies (and older bodies, for that matter!), with the extreme gravitational forces they exert, the significant vibrations that ricochet through the body, and the sudden, jerky movements that can strain necks and other joints. Also, nobody wants to see you step out onto the ride platform, and empty all contents of your stomach with various sugary sweets and ice cream. Slow and gentle rides are just as good as thrill rides.

Glorious Water – On average a regular adult should drink about 8 pints of water a day, (well that’s what we get told anyway!). But when visiting a Theme Park in extreme heat we should try and drink more, as heatstroke can set in quicker than you think while you’re walking round the park, queueing up for rides and even while on the rides themselves. Most Theme Parks have got plenty of places available for you to fill up your empty bottles. The Toilets. Now I don’t mean the toilets themselves, but there will usually be a separate tap in the toilets stating that the water is drinking water and therefore you should take full advantage of this. You can visit http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Heat-exhaustion-and-heatstroke/Pages/Symptoms.aspx to read about the symptoms of Heat Exhaustation, Heat stroke and what to do if one of these occurs.

Sun Cream/After Sun – You can buy both of these at most shops, or even at the parks themselves (but at a higher price), and these will make your day a whole lot better. Using the sun cream while also keeping yourself well hydrated with plenty of water will minimise your risks of feeling unwell by 80%. If you do happen to get sun burnt, then the after sun will help when you get back from a visit to a park, while relaxing in the comfort of your home, or caravan! If you ask nicely enough most Staff Members carry Sun Cream around with them and may give you some of theirs to help you out. But remember to keep re-applying throughout the day, as a soaking from a water ride can wash this off.

Wear a hat – Something simple as wearing a hat can protect your head, and most of your face from getting sunburnt while not putting you out at all. When you put on a hat, it’s just there. You don’t need to fiddle around with it, or keep re-applying it throughout the day. Just remember to take it off before going upside down on any rides.

Take a backpack – All of the above mentioned  items can be easily carried in just one simple backpack. A simple, yet effective backpack will be filled with Sun Cream, After sun,  hats, sunglasses, snacks, water, first aid kit and any medication if it is required.

This may be a lot to take in, but we need to respect so many different things at Theme Parks that sometimes we can forget the odd one or two. Following these simple steps, plus any others you may think of, will make for a much easier and enjoyable day for you and everyone you go with.

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